EVERYONE is a BEEKEEPER

…. or not!

beesonflowers-150x150Does your backyard have honeybees? Been wondering where have all the bees gone? YOU stopped keeping them! Using pesticides, herbicides, fungicides…. have you read the labels on how to apply? Does your yard look like a golf course? YOU stopped keeping bees!! The decline in the honeybee population correlates to the rise in chemical use in our agriculture practices. “Agriculture practices” includes using lawn services that kill clover, a common homeowner’s practice. The food sources for the honeybee have literally been almost eliminated. We are killing our honeybees by starving them and poisoning them.

What can you do?
1. Stop using lawn services and begin to consider a natural lawn is a beautiful lawn that feeds beneficial insects.
2. Set your lawn mower to cut at a higher height. Maybe even hold off mowing a day or so longer than you normally would.
3. Put the RoundUp away. At the very least, read the instructions on how to use and when to use. Late in the evening and non-windy days are the best times (if there is a best time).
4. Consider alternative natural weed killers like using vinegar or boiling water.
5. PLANT BEE ATTRACTING PLANTS! When you visit the home improvement stores and nurseries, notice which plants are being visited by honeybees. The bees will tell you which plants to buy.

Below is a partial list of bee-friendly plants, trees, shrubs and herbs as well as some further advice on planting a pollinating flower bed.

In recent years, Colony Collapse Disorder has caused an annual reduction of 30%-40% of bee colonies. Planting pollinator attracting plants help to provide food for not only the honeybee, but other pollinators such as butterflies.

Pollinator habitats are generally composed of both wildflowers and native perennials and annuals. A well-designed bed will have at least 2 species blooming all during the growing season.

Native bees are estimated to provide $3 billion in pollinating services in the US. In countries where the pollinators have been diminished to almost non-existence, pollination is being done by hand.

 

HONEYBEE ATTRACTING TREES & SHRUBS:

COMMON NAME
Alder
Apple
Azalea
Basswood
Black Chokeberry
Blackberry
Blueberry
Cherry
Chestnut
Corneliancherry Dogwood
Crap Apple
Elderberry
Elm
Hazelnut
Hickory
Holly
Honey Locust
Maple
Mountain Laurel
Oak
Ohio Buckeye
Pear
Pine
Pussy Willow
Raspberry
Red Cedar
Red Chokeberry
Red Bud
Sassafras
Willow
Yellow Popular
FLOWERING DATES
Feb – Apr
Apr – May
June – Aug
June – July
May – June
May – June
May – June
Apr – May
May – June
Mar – Apri
Mar – Jun
June – July
Feb – Apr
Mar – Apr
June – Sept
Apr – June
May – June
Feb – Apr
Apr – June
May – Sept
Apr – May
Apr – May
June – Sept
Mar – Apr
May – June
June – Sept
May – June
Apr -May
Apr – May
Feb – Apr
May – June
HONEYBEE ATTRACTING PLANTS (includes HERBS):
COMMON NAME
Alyssum
Anise hyssop
Aster
Autumn Joy
Black Locust
Blue Vervain
Candytuft
Cat-Tail
Catmint (&Catnip)
Chives
Common Vetch
Crocus
Dandelion
Garlic Chives
Globe Thistle
Golden Rod
Hairy Vetch
Hop Clover
Hungarian Speedwell
(Snapdragon Family)
Lambs Ears
Lavendar
Leopards Bane
Lungwort
Milk Vetch
Milkweed
Mountain Mint
Mustard
Oregano
Pot Marigold
Red Clover
Red-Flowering Thyme
Rose
Russian Sage
Speedwell (Snapdragons)
Spring Vetch
Sunflower
Thistle
White Sweet Clover
White Dutch Clover
Yellow Sweet Clover
FLOWERING DATES
June to Sept
July to frost
Sept to frost
Aug to Sept
May to June
July to Aug
May
June to July
June to Sept
May to Sept
July to Aug
April
April to May
Aug to Sept
Aug
Sept to Oct
June to July
June to July
JulyMay
June to Sept
Apr to May
May
May to June
July to Aug
Aug to frost
Apr to May
June to Sept
June to Sept
June to July
June to July
June to Sept
July to Sept
June
July to Aug
June to Sept
July to Sept
May to Aug
June to July
May to Aug